Bring nature within to create peace of mind

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The floor is not tiled, the walls and ceiling are not plastered or painted – it feels like an invitation to nature, a rough and rustic atmosphere abounds

April 05, 2022 at 11:30 am

Last modified: April 05, 2022, 11:34 am

There is a cozy seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

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There is a cozy seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

Every artist needs their own space – a space where they can relax without distractions. Where there are no limits to creativity; where fantasy follows no rules.

Abul Basher is a Commercial Film Director, VFX Compositor and Graphic Designer by trade. During his 18-year career he has worked for a variety of creative companies. All these years his creations were there for others.

Ever since he started out as a graphic designer, the idea of ​​having his own studio has been dormant, and it only recently came to fruition.

The odds have never been good. In 2012 he tried to bring the idea to life. However, this endeavor failed as he quickly realized his unwillingness to complete the task.

But eventually Dzable Studio came to life. He designed the space himself, where he currently directs and produces commercials and animations.

We recently visited his latest dream project. We spent hours spanning the entire afternoon into late evening discussing the ins and outs of the studio.

The studio’s name is Dzable Studio, which is short for “digitally possible”. It can be difficult to analyze and derive meaning from when you hear it for the first time. But that is its desired effect.

The floor is covered with gravel, which makes a mild noise when walking. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

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The floor is covered with gravel, which makes a mild noise when walking.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The floor is covered with gravel, which makes a mild noise when walking. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The studio is on the 4th floor of his home in Mirpur. The area is around 1200 square meters. It’s not just his job per se; Also in this place he welcomes the creative souls to rest or adda. He wanted to combine work and leisure under one roof.

Sunlight poured everywhere when we entered the room in the afternoon. We weren’t expecting much and were informed in advance that the “magic” begins after the evening.

However, we were struck by the simplicity and minimalism and wondered how artificial lighting would bring magic to the space.

Light and acoustics play a major role in the overall ambience.

When we entered the room, we stepped barefoot on gravel. With every step there was a soft sound and a distinct feeling in your foot. The idea serves a functional purpose.

“First of all, the sound is soothing. The loose gravel is intentional. When I step on it after a long stint at my desk, the sound and a massaging feeling on my feet takes the stress out of me. That’s the fun of loose gravel, but most people.” fix him in plaster,” Basher noted.

Basher loves the sound of running water and when he’s in his working state it calms him down. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

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Basher loves the sound of running water and when he's in his working state it calms him down.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

Basher loves the sound of running water and when he’s in his working state it calms him down. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The inspiration for the design came from the desire to integrate nature into minimalism. In fact, it feels like an invitation to nature, a raw and rustic vibe abounds. The floor is not tiled, the walls and ceilings are neither plastered nor painted, the only exception being a white wall color on one side.

There is a cozy seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. This waterway separates this space from the other parts of the studio. Basher said he loved the sound of water splashing, and when he was in his working state it calmed him. In addition, the cold touch of water makes him feel closer to nature.

In a corner of the room you will find a large tree trunk.

All these touches are intended to integrate nature into this space as much as possible.

“In a crowded city without much greenery, this is badly needed for personal health,” Bascher said. “My roots are in nature. At the beginning of my career I used the pretext of work to distance myself from nature. Now I’m going back to my roots.”

“If I could, I would have added ice and fire too!” Basher joked.

Construction of the project began in early February this year. And it only took 20 days to create the current interior. In particular, he did not accept help from outsiders.

“Everything is done with the help of friends or family members. Even the wall paint is made by ourselves. The wiring and the insertion of the light bulbs is also carried out by us. Each individual stone is washed and cleaned by hand. We also did the plumbing.”

The whole project is basically improvised. The stone collection, for example, has an interesting history.

The walls and ceilings are neither plastered nor painted, the only exception being a one-sided white wall paint. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

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The walls and ceilings are neither plastered nor painted, the only exception being a one-sided white wall paint.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The walls and ceilings are neither plastered nor painted, the only exception being a one-sided white wall paint. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“One day I was walking,” Basher explained, “and I saw a large cairn at a construction site near the Mirpur Beribdh area. I instantly had a click in my brain. I bought 2 tons of stones there. “

When he received the trunk and branches, he said, “These are only those of one tree. I knew a friend of mine had a dead tree in his house.

The whole process of getting the tree cost him 200k – he paid the amount to the van driver. And this information gives us insight into the budget and expenses of the project.

In the beginning there was a lot of research. However, Basher had one thing in mind: the effort should be as small as possible. “To be honest, we had a lot of brainstorming. But whatever we considered and calculated the cost, we saw that it would consume our resources. When it comes to budget, my first condition was that we can’t overspend. So I had to get creative.”

When Basher brought stones, logs and branches, his father thought it was crazy. His father scared him, but he kept mentioning his “twin friend” Alvi Chowdhury, who encouraged him to stick with the plan.

According to Basher, the total costs are less than Tk 150,000. Because there are no plaster, tiles or false ceilings, the effort is low.

The place caters to all basher likes and tastes. “Heaven is everywhere. You just have to create it. This is my personal heaven and the studio is my personal canvas where I have total artistic freedom.”

But it’s not just a workplace. As you enter the room, you’ll find a rocking chair on the right, while a tent and swing are on the left side of the room. Not the rigid and sterile workplaces that are the overwhelming norm.

According to Basher, the project is still incomplete. 30 percent of the work still needs to be done. But he added that this is an ongoing experiment. So things are open to change. One of his next plans is to build an indoor water fountain next to the tent and swing. And then he wants to go to the water well.

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